Category Archives: Naming and Registration

The business name must be registered with the county clerk’s office and/or the Secretary of State.

Registering an Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN)

A Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) is an identification number used by the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) in the administration of tax laws. It is issued either by the Social Security Administration (SSA) or by the IRS. A Social Security number (SSN) is issued by the SSA whereas all other TINs are issued by the IRS.

Taxpayer Identification Numbers:

  • Social Security Number SSN
  • Employer Identification Number EIN
  • Individual Taxpayer Identification Number ITIN
  • Taxpayer Identification Number for Pending U.S. Adoptions ATIN
  • Preparer Taxpayer Identification Number PTIN

Registering an Employer ID Number (EIN)

An Employer Identification Number (EIN) is also known as a Federal Tax Identification Number, and is used to identify a business entity. Generally, businesses need an EIN. You may apply for an EIN in various ways, and now you may apply online. This is a free service offered by the Internal Revenue Service. You must check with your state to make sure you need a state number or charter.

An Employer Identification Number (EIN) is a nine-digit number that IRS assigns in the following format: XX-XXXXXXX. It is used to identify the tax accounts of employers and certain others who have no employees. An EIN is for use in connection with your business activities only. Do not use your EIN in place of your social security number (SSN).

Filing the Assumed Name Certificate

Each county clerk office may use a different form; however, the information requested should be the same. Be prepared to provide the business name, mailing address, city, state, zip, expected period of operation, business type, and owner information.

Period of operation is the period of time the business will use the name. Ten years is the maximum length of time an assumed name filing is valid. However, if the name will be used for a period of less than ten years, indicate this on the form. Note that names must also be renewed every ten years.

Business type refers to the legal structure of the business. Indicate whether the business will operate as a corporation, partnership, sole proprietorship, etc.

Owner information is the name(s) of the owner(s), personal address(es), and signature(s). All owners’ signatures must be notarized. This service is sometimes offered at the county clerk’s office. The form cannot be filed until all owners have signed it and all signatures have been notarized.

The following information will be helpful in filing the Assumed Name Certificate in the county the business will operate. First, write down the name of the business you will be considering. Pay close attention to capitalization, spacing, punctuation, etc. Consider this carefully as this name will identify the business to the public.

Next, search the county records for that exact business name in the assumed name books or computer. An assumed name filing is valid for ten years, so search records for the last ten years to verify that the name is available. One book will not necessarily encompass one year of filings, so check the front of the book for dates. Some records are computerized; however, a computerized index may not contain ten years of filing history. Use the computer for the period it covers, and then use the books for any of the remaining ten years. If the business name has been used, look in the margin to see if it has been abandoned. If the name has been abandoned, it can legally be used again. Many county clerk offices will provide a name search service for a nominal fee. The whole search process will often be taken care of through the mail. Please contact the local county clerk for verification of their process.

Finally, if the company name is available, fill out the assumed name form and have it notarized. Then file it with the county clerk’s office. The county clerk will keep the original Assumed Name Certificate, so be sure to request several certified copies (at least one for the bank and one for your business records). For filing fee information and accepted form of payment, contact the local county clerk’s office. Most county clerk offices accept cash, certified checks, or money orders. If processing via mail, send the forms by certified mail with a return receipt requested to verify receipt by the county clerk.

Local Registration (Assumed Name Certificate)

If the business will operate as a sole proprietorship or a general partnership, an Assumed Name Certificate or d.b.a. (doing business as) for each name (or deviation of that name) the business will use must be on file with the county clerk in each county where a business premise will be maintained. If no business premise will be maintained, it should be filed in each county where business will be conducted.

If the business will operate as a corporation, limited partnership, or limited liability company, and the business will be identified by a name other than the name on file with the Secretary of State, an Assumed Name Certificate must be filed with the Secretary of State and each county in which the business will have a registered or principal office. Neither the filing of an Assumed Name Certificate nor the reservation or registration of a company name imparts any real protection to the party filing the certificate. It is merely a formal process that informs the general public of the registered agent for a business and where official contact with the business can be made.

State Registration of Your Business

All businesses operating in a state as limited partnerships, registered limited liability partnerships, limited liability companies, corporations, professional corporations, nonprofit corporations, and professional associations must register with the Secretary of State.

Corporations, limited partnerships, and limited liability companies organized in other states or countries may transact business in a state by obtaining a certificate of authority through the Secretary of State. The Secretary of State can provide forms for the certificate of authority. An out-of-state business may also consider the option of creating an in state corporation, limited partnership, or limited liability company for transaction of business in that state

A name may not be used by more than one corporation in the state. The Secretary of State will perform a name search to verify that no other corporation, limited partnership, or limited liability company in the state is using the exact name selected. To find out if a business name is available, call the Secretary of State and they will do an immediate computer search. The search is only for business names registered with the Secretary of State, and does not include business names registered only a county clerk.

If a corporation will transact business under names other than that stated in the articles of incorporation, the corporation must file an Assumed Name Certificate with the Secretary of State, and with the county clerk in which the principal office and registered office of the corporation are located.